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Friday, July 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community found in the catalog.

Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community

Jill Rubery

Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community

synthesis report

by Jill Rubery

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by Office for Official Publications of the European Communities in Luxembourg .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementwritten by Jill Rubery and Collette Fagan.
SeriesSocial Europe -- 3/93
ContributionsFagan, Collette., Commission of the European Communities. Directorate-General for Employment, Industrial Relations and Social Affairs.
The Physical Object
Paginationxxii,148p.
Number of Pages148
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22335107M
ISBN 109282659267

Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community. (). Occupational segregation: a comparative study of the degree and pattern of the differentiation between men and women's work in Britain, the United States and other countries. This article uses detailed occupational data from the Census to investigate patterns of occupational segregation for women and men in the different ethnic groups. Gini index values suggest that the Black minority ethnic groups identified in the Census were less gender segregated than White was less ethnic variation in women.

Occupational gender segregation is a strong feature of the US labor market. While some occupations have become in-creasingly integrated over time, others re-main highly dominated by either men or women. Our analysis of trends in overall gender segregation shows that, after a con-siderable move towards more integrated occupations in the s. OCCUPATIONAL SEGREGATION “Occupational segregation is a term that is used to describe employment patterns where workers with certain characteristics tend to be grouped in certain jobs. Understanding the scope and causes of occupational segregation is key to tackling gender, disability and ethnicity pay gaps.

Occupational segregation contributes to a _____— the disparity between women's and men's earn- ings. The pay gap is calculated by dividing women's earnings by men's earnings to yield a percentage, also known as the earnings ratio. tablishment segregation for observed wage differences. Second, establishment segregation was an important cause, although not as important as occupational segregation, of wage differences. Third, establishment segregation was extensive, as was occupational segre-gation. I. INTRODUCTION Wage differences between men and women caused by.


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Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community by Jill Rubery Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Rubery, Jill. Occupational segregation of women and men in the European Community. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, Occupational choices have long-term implications for women’s economic independence, in particular, where women concentrate in occupations that are lower paid and/or have fewer long-term prospects than occupations where men concentrate.

Occupational segregation has both horizontal and vertical dimensions. New Zealand has a clear pattern of horizontal segregation with around. Gender segregation by occupation is the tendency for men and women to be employed in different fields. Occupational segregation is caused by gender bias based on stereotypical, biological and social differences between the two.

There have been two types of gender segregation identified: horizontal segregation and vertical segregation. Occupational Segregation. PREVALENCE BY RACE, ETHNICITY, AND SEX. THEORETICAL EXPLANATIONS. POTENTIAL REMEDIES.

BIBLIOGRAPHY. Occupational racial/ethnic and sex segregation—the separation of non-Hispanic white men and women and workers of color into different occupations—is more than a pattern of physical separation of the races and sexes at work.

Occupational segregation is the distribution of workers across and within occupations, based upon demographic characteristics, most often gender. Occupational segregation levels differ on a basis of perfect segregation and integration.

Perfect segregation occurs. These estimates reveal that there is less occupational segregation between black women and white men at higher levels of education. Inthe DSI for black women and white men with a high school diploma or less was 62 percent, while for those with 1–2 years of college the index decreases marginally to 60 percent.

In the countries studied, occupational segregation by gender was real and substantial: Men tend to be concentrated in what have come to be perceived as “male” occupations and women in “female” ones.

The five countries with the highest level of occupational segregation were Finland, Demark, Sweden, Portugal and Poland. Using data from Spain's Economically Active Population Survey (Encuesta de Población Activa), the results suggest that immigrant women in Spain suffered a double burden from occupational segregation since it affected them to a greater degree than either native women or immigrant men.

In fact, gender is a useful variable for understanding. Occupational segregation is the result of “push” and “pull” factors rooted in social interaction and social structure. These factors include discrimination against women or mothers, gender-specific socialization, gender-linked traits or “natural” abilities, cultural beliefs about men and women’s competence.

Why does occupational segregation by gender persist. Traditional economic theory explained occupational segregation by gender as an inevitable consequence of “natural differences” in skills between women and men, but contemporary economists have refocused the blame on gender discrimination by employers, coworkers, and other actors.

The increasing participation of European women in the labour market might be expected to lead to integration and equality and away from gender segregation and inequality. This study of occupational segregation among men and women in the European Community shows.

This book presents a comprehensive analysis of the levels and recent changes in the sex segregation of occupations.

It is based on a unique new ILO data set which contains detailed occupational data from 41 countries or territories from all regions of the world. As shown by new evidence presented here, well over half of all non-agricultural workers in the sample countries and areas work in an.

This paper examines gender differentials in earnings in Macedonia, with special emphasis on the role of occupational segregation. The lower earnings of women in Macedonia cannot be explained by gender differences in measured human capital endowments.

There is a high degree of segregation of jobs along gender lines, the end product of which is lower earnings for women relative to men. Occupational segregation by sex accounts for a significant part of the observed wage gap between men and women (World Bank, ),4 and occupational segregation is also an important factor in explaining part-time pay penalties.

Manning and Petrongolo () show that, in Britain, the part-time pay penalty becomes very small if. Segregation is made up of two dimensions: vertical segregation and horizontal segregation.

The phenomenon of occupational sex segregation can be used to explain each: pay differentials between men and women across occupations within a given labour force characterize vertical segregation, while horizontal segregation illustrates the separation.

"Occupational Ghettos: The World Wide Segregation of Women and Men addresses a fundamental paradox for gender and work: Women are increasingly present in high-status occupations, but the decline in sex segregation has stalled.

In a provocative thesis Maria Charles and David Grusky identify two dimensions of segregation: a hierarchical dimension. Thus, immigrant women from the European Union (EU) have the lowest occupational segregation, while segregation seems particularly intense in the group of women from European.

comparative study, gender inequality, job quality, occupational segregation Introduction That men gain higher rewards than women from formal employment is well documented: men’s employment is more stable, their salaries are higher and they have more opportu-nities for advancement and access to lucrative jobs (Blau et al., ).

Equally docu. Inin the USA, the index of occupational segregation by race, computed over the eleven major census occupational categories, was 24 for men (comparing white men to nonwhite men) and 17 for women (comparing white women to non-white women) (Reskin and Hartmann ).These values reflect a considerable decline that took place during the post World War II period; in the index for.

occupational distributions of men and women in Europe. Using data from the eighth wave () of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP), the paper documents the degree of occupational segregation in a sample of three Western European countries with different occupational sex segregation regimes, Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom (UK).

In practice, conceiving gender segregation in relative terms can be problematic, as the main reason why women tend to account for less than 50 % of the employed workforce is the gender division of domestic labour and women's disproportionate share of unpaid care and domestic work.Rubery, Jill/Fagan, Colette (): ″Occupational Segregation of Women and Men in the European Community″, Social Europe, Supplement 3/93, Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities Google Scholar.Distribution of men and women, by occupation percent female Note: Full-time, year-round workers.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey. Figure 1. Distribution of men and women, by occupation percent female. Cumulative distributions of men and women, by percent female in occupation Note: Full-time, year-round workers.